Privacy & Cookies Notice


What personal information do you collect?

In some areas, we may ask you to register your name, email address and relevant personal details. We will also collect information from you if complete any other forms on our site or if you contact us with comments or specific requests.

This information is only used for the intended purpose and, if we wish to use it for any other purpose, we will ask you first.

If you choose to complete any of our online forms, DAAR Communications Plc will not use the personal information you provide us with for marketing purposes without first gaining your consent. We may pass your details on to third party service providers who are contracted to DAAR Communications Plc in the course of dealing with your request. These third parties are obliged to keep your details securely, will use them only to fulfil the request and will dispose of the information at the appropriate time.

No personal information you have given us will be passed on to third parties for commercial purposes. Our policy is that all information will be shared among staff and other agencies where the legal framework allows it, if this will help to improve the service you receive and to develop other services.

If you do not wish certain information about you to be exchanged within any of DAARGroup websites, you can request that this does not happen. You can write to, or email us, quoting Section 4 & Part 11 of the Computer Security and Critical Information Infrastructure Protection Bill 2005 and we will consider your request and respond to you.

Collecting information automatically

We collect statistics about your visit to our website. We use this information to track user activity which in turn helps us to improve the website. These statistics do not contain personal data and cannot be traced back to an individual.

We use ‘cookies’ to collect this statistical information. However, the cookies themselves do not store personal information.

What is a cookie?

A cookie is a piece of information in the form of a small text file that is placed on an internet user's hard drive. It is generated by a web server, which is the computer that operates a website.

The information the cookie contains is set by the server and it can be used by that server whenever the user visits the site. A cookie can be thought of as an internet user's identification card, which tell a website when the user has returned.

What is the purpose of cookies?

Cookies make the interaction between users and websites faster and easier. Without cookies, it would be very difficult for a website to allow a visitor to fill up a shopping cart or to remember the user's preferences or registration details for a future visit.

Websites use cookies mainly because they save time and make the browsing experience more efficient and enjoyable. Websites often use cookies for the purposes of collecting demographic information about their users.

Cookies enable websites to monitor their users' web surfing habits and profile them for marketing purposes (for example, to find out which products or services they are interested in and send them targeted advertisements.)

Are cookies dangerous?

No. Cookies are small pieces of text. They are not computer programs, and they can't be executed as code. Also, they cannot be used to disseminate viruses, and modern versions of Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla or Firefox browsers all allow users to set their own limitations to the number of cookies saved on their hard drives.

Can cookies threaten users' privacy?

Cookies are stored on the computer's hard drive. They cannot access the hard drive - so a cookie cannot read other information saved on the hard drive, or get a user's email address etc. They only contain and transfer to the server as much information as the users themselves have disclosed to a certain website.

A server cannot set a cookie for a domain that it is not a member of. In spite of this, users quite often find in their computer files cookies from websites that they have never visited. These cookies are usually set by companies that sell internet advertising on behalf of other websites.

Therefore it may be possible that users' information is passed to third party websites without the users' knowledge or consent, such as information on surfing habits. This is the most common reason for people rejecting or fearing cookies.


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